Anne Lilly

Sculptor Anne Lilly uses carefully engineered motion to manipulate our perceptions of time, place and self. Her austere, meticulously constructed sculptures move in organic, fluid and mesmeric ways, and are fabricated in machined metals. Employing opposing modalities -- analytical and intuitive, rational and emotional -- Lilly's sculptures elicit new connections between the physical world outside ourselves and our own private, psychological interior.

In 2018 Lilly installed Temple of Mnemon, an architectural environment of shifting, overhead mirrors on the Rose Kennedy Greenway in Boston. She has received the Barnett and Annalee Newman Foundation Grant Award for Lifetime Achievement, the Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Fellowship, the Blanche E. Colman Grant, and visiting artist positions at the Isabella Stuart Gardner Museum, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Art Institute of Boston. Her work was included in a landmark exhibition of kinetic art at the MIT Museum, and has been collected by the Jewish Museum, the DeCordova Museum, the New Britain Museum of American Art, the Middlebury College Museum of Art, and numerous corporate and private collections internationally. In 2017, Interview Magazine named her exhibit the “#1 Pick” of the Seattle Art Fair, and she was the invitational lecturer and guest critic at Lebanese American University in Beirut, Lebanon.

Lilly holds a Bachelor of Architecture, magna cum laude, from Virginia Tech, and has taught at
MIT and Massachusetts College of Art. She is represented by Sponder Gallery in Boca Raton,
FL and Rice/Polak Gallery in Provincetown, MA.

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"Anne Lilly’s captivating stainless steel sculptures...are so intricately engineered they appear to do magic. Tall rods rising from cylinders planted on gears rush toward each other, bowing, then fall away in one fluid motion. Rotating grills look like they’ll collide, then they miraculously pass. The movement of each sparely designed piece is full of grace and surprise."

- Cate McQuaid, the Boston Globe